ⓘ 6mm Remington. The 6mm Remington rifle cartridge, originally introduced in 1955 by Remington Arms Company as the.244 Remington, is based on a necked down.257 Ro ..

                                     

ⓘ 6mm Remington

The 6mm Remington rifle cartridge, originally introduced in 1955 by Remington Arms Company as the.244 Remington, is based on a necked down.257 Roberts cartridge using a.24/6mm bullet. Known for a combination of high velocity, long range, flat trajectory, and accuracy, it is suitable as a dual use hunting cartridge for both medium-sized big game and varmints. When used in the less common earlier slow twist barrels, it offers exceptional range for varmint applications. While not as commercially popular today as the.243 Winchester, the 6mm Remington enjoys a slight ballistic advantage and continues to be popular with handloaders and custom rifle builders.

                                     

1. Developmental History

By the early 1950s, there had been a significant amount of experimentation and wildcatting in developing the.24 caliber bullet as a dual purpose hunting round. Popular cartridges necked down for this purpose included the.257 Roberts based on the 7x57mm Mauser and.308 Winchester.

Remington determined that a 90 grain soft point.244 hunting bullet was well suited for medium-sized big game hunting purposes. For the length and weight of its 90 grain soft point hunting bullet, Remington selected a 1 in 12-inch twist. By selecting the slowest twist possible, Remington was seeking to avoid excessive spin. By avoiding excessive spin they were able to maximize velocity, range and accuracy of their 90 grain big game hunting bullet as well as lighter varmint loads.

Public perception and understanding of ballistics in the 1950s did not agree with this approach. By 1958, Remington was obliged to increase the 722s twist to 1 in 9 inches, well in excess of what is needed to stabilize a 90 grain bullet. Remington continued to offer factory ammo in 75 and 90 grain bullets.

Remington also added several other rifles chambered for the.244 cartridge including the Model 740, Model 742, Model 760 and finally the Model 725. However, by 1962, presumably due to lack of sales, Remington no longer chambered rifles for.244 cartridge.

In 1963, on the heels of its successful first year launch of the new Remington Model 700 bolt action hunting rifle, the.244 was re-introduced but renamed 6mm Remington. The 700 continued with the 1 in 9-inch twist and Remington also introduced new 6mm ammunition loaded with a 100 grain Cor-Lokt bullet. The new model could also shoot any.244 ammunition. Previous Remington 722 rifles made after 1957 with 1 in 9-inch twist could also shoot the newer 6mm 100 grain ammunition.5

Remington labeled their new 100 grain bullet ammunition as "6mm" when introduced. However Remington continued to manufacture and label the 75 and 90 grain bullet ammunition as ".244" for a number of years. From the late 1960s until the early 1970s Remington transitioned to labeling all such ammunition regardless of bullet grain weight only as "6mm."

                                     

2. Performance

Velocity

The following table provides performance specifications published in Remington catalogs in 1955 and 1963, the first years the respective cartridges were introduced to the public.

                                     

2.1. Performance Velocity

The following table provides performance specifications published in Remington catalogs in 1955 and 1963, the first years the respective cartridges were introduced to the public.

                                     

2.2. Performance Comparison

Inevitably the 6mm Remington cartridge is highly comparable to the 243 Winchester. Both were intended for the same purposes, both developed out of wildcat loads and both were introduced in the same year. In 1963 Remington produced both cartridges using their own sourced brass, primers, powder and bullets. This allows for comparative data from a single manufacturer and in the case of the 100 grain bullet, identical bullets were even used. The following table summarizes performance data published in Remingtons 1963 catalog:

The following summarizes comparative trajectory data between the 6mm Remington and.243 Winchester using the same 100 grain bullet:

                                     

3. Market Acceptance

The.244 Remington lagged in the marketplace of the mid-1950s. Winchester also introduced a similar dual purpose cartridge of the same caliber with greater success in 1955, the.243 Winchester, but with 80 and 100 grain bullet options for its Model 70 with a 1 in 10-inch twist to allow for the slightly heavier bullet. offering comes in the M722 which is one of the least expensive, yet most modernly designed, bolt guns on the market."

The 721/722 rifle line was an overall success for Remington in various calibers and competitively priced as a value offering for the market.

                                     

4. Firearms

Remington chambered at least twelve rifles for the 6mm cartridge.

Bolt-action Rifles

  • Remington Model 600
  • Remington Model 722
  • Remington Model 788
  • Remington Model 725
  • Remington Model 660
  • Remington Model 700

Semi-automatic Rifles

  • Remington Model 7400
  • Remington Model Four
  • Remington Model 740
  • Remington Model 742

Pump-action Rifles

  • Remington Model 760
  • Remington Model 7600

Other manufacturers including Marlin, Savage, and Ruger have also chambered rifles for 6mm Remington over the years.



                                     

5. Legacy

Ultimately the buying public of the 1950s responded more favorably to the.243 Winchester while the.244 struggled to gain greater market acceptance early on. Whether this was due to Winchester’s slightly heavier big game bullet or the differences in the aesthetic features of the initial rifles themselves or other factors altogether, it is difficult to say in retrospect. Remington was quickly responsive to early criticism by changing the twist rate in 1958 to allow for heavier bullets, replacing the 722BDL with the even more upscale Model 725ADL rifle in 1958 and ultimately transitioning to the highly successful Model 700. Remington even re-branded the cartridge name itself for a fresh start with a 100-grain factory load as 6mm Remington. While the 6mm Remington cartridge never took over the.24 caliber dual purpose market lead from.243 Winchester, it was successfully sustained in production for nearly six decades.

As compared to the 1950s, there is broader public insight and knowledge of ballistic information today. This has led to a greater appreciation of the 6mm Remington. Hunters and long range shooters appreciate the cartridge capacity and ballistic advantage the 6mm Remington cartridge has. Handloaders benefit from a long cartridge neck which facilitates loading operations and one of the widest selections of bullets available in any caliber. Prized among some are the earlier slow twist version.244 rifles for their ability to push higher velocities with lighter loads due to a lack of excessive spin.