ⓘ Andersons lupine. Lupinus andersonii is a species of lupine known by the common name Andersons lupine. It is native to California and adjacent sections of Orego ..

                                     

ⓘ Andersons lupine

Lupinus andersonii is a species of lupine known by the common name Andersons lupine. It is native to California and adjacent sections of Oregon and Nevada, where it grows in dry mountain habitat of various types. This lupine is similar to Lupinus albicaulis in appearance. It is a hairy, erect perennial herb growing 20 to 90 centimeters in height. Each palmate leaf is made up of 6 to 9 leaflets each up to 6 centimeters long. The inflorescence is up to 23 centimeters long, bearing whorls of flowers each roughly a centimeter long. The flower is purple to yellowish or whitish in color. The fruit is a silky-hairy legume pod up to 4.5 centimeters long containing several seeds. It was named after Charles Lewis Anderson by Sereno Watson.

                                     
  • Lupinus, commonly known as lupin or lupine is a genus of flowering plants in the legume family Fabaceae. The genus includes over 200 species, with centers
  • region of New York. The butterfly, whose life cycle depends on the wild blue lupine flower Lupinus perennis was classified as an endangered species in 1992
  • species in New York State. Other species to be found include wild blue lupine also rare, and the food for the frosted elfin barrens buckmoth Hemileuca
  • Recreation. Other wildflowers within the reserve include the owl s clover, lupine goldfields, cream cups and coreopsis. The intense blooming season for the
  • America and is sometimes used in feed for cattle if the toxicity of the given lupine is low enough. The toxicity of the plant comes from a variety of toxins
  • praise and even national recognition. Myrick often promoted the use of blue lupine as a winter forage crop that would prevent erosion, building soil and holding
  • the river is characterized by typical tundra vegetation such as sedge and lupine meadows, and some willow patches along the lower Hornaday. While a dense
  • in the area. Local wildflowers include arrow balsam, Indian paintbrush, lupine penstemon, and pinedrop. The water level in Whychus Creek fluctuates dramatically
  • prairie offers a variety of grasses and wildflowers including varieties of lupine thistle and wild oats. The typical annual plant productivity is approximately
  • Barbieri identified a compound with the empirical formula, C9H11NO2, in yellow lupine Lupinus luteus seedlings. In 1882, Erlenmeyer and Lipp first synthesized