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Duro v. Reina

Duro v. Reina, 495 U.S. 676, was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court concluded that Indian tribes could not prosecute Indians who were members of other tribes for crimes committed by those nonmember Indians on their reservations ...

Oliphant v. Suquamish Indian Tribe

Oliphant v. Suquamish Indian Tribe, 435 U.S. 191, is a United States Supreme Court case deciding "whether Indian tribal courts have criminal jurisdiction over non-Indians". The Court held that they did not. The case was decided on March 6, 1978, ...

United States v. Antelope

United States v. Antelope, 430 U.S. 641, was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held that American Indians convicted on reservation land were not deprived of the equal protection of the laws; the federal criminal statutes are n ...

United States v. John (1978)

United States v. John, 437 U.S. 634, was a case in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that lands designated as a reservation in Mississippi are "Indian country" as defined by statute, although the reservation was established nearly ...

United States v. Kagama

United States v. Kagama, 118 U.S. 375, was a United States Supreme Court case that upheld the constitutionality of the Major Crimes Act of 1885. This Congressional act gave the federal courts jurisdiction in certain cases of Indian-on-Indian crim ...

United States v. Lara

United States v. Lara, 541 U.S. 193, was a United States Supreme Court case which held that both the United States and a Native American tribe could prosecute an Indian for the same acts that constituted crimes in both jurisdictions. The Court he ...

United States v. McBratney

United States v. McBratney, 104 U.S. 621, was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held that upon the admission of Colorado as a state, there being no reservation to the United States of jurisdiction over the Indian territory wit ...

United States v. Quiver

United States v. Quiver, 241 U.S. 602, is a case decided by the United States Supreme Court after first appearing in United States District Court for the District of South Dakota. The case argued on February 28, 1916 and decided on June 12, 1916 ...

United States v. Ramsey (1926)

United States v. Ramsey, 271 U.S. 467, was a U.S. Supreme Court case in which the Court held that the government had the authority to prosecute crimes against Native Americans on reservation land that was still designated Indian Country by federa ...

United States v. Rogers

United States v. Rogers, 45 U.S. 567, was a case in which the Supreme Court of the United States holding that a white man, adopted into an Indian tribe, does not become exempt from the enforcement of the laws prohibiting murder.

Worcester v. Georgia

Worcester v. Georgia, 31 U.S. 515, was a landmark case in which the United States Supreme Court vacated the conviction of Samuel Worcester and held that the Georgia criminal statute that prohibited non-Native Americans from being present on Nativ ...

Apostolic Pardon

In the Catholic Church, the Apostolic Pardon is an indulgence given for the remission of temporal punishment due to sin. The Apostolic Pardon is given by a priest, usually along with Viaticum. It is not usually given as part of the sacrament of A ...

Pardon of Joe Arpaio

On August 25, 2017, President Donald Trump pardoned Joe Arpaio for criminal contempt of court, a misdemeanor. Arpaio had been convicted of the crime two months earlier for disobeying a federal judges order to stop racial profiling in detaining "i ...

Commonwealth v. Brady

Commonwealth v. Brady, 510 Pa. 123, 507 A.2d 66, is a case decided by the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania in 1986 which overruled close to two centuries of decisional law in Pennsylvania and established a common law exception to the rule against he ...

Due Process Clause

The Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution each contain a due process clause. Due process deals with the administration of justice and thus the due process clause acts as a safeguard from arbitrary denial of life, liber ...

Students & Administration Equality Act

The Students & Administration Equality Act, commonly known as The SAE Act ", is a law that guarantees a student or student organization in higher education institutions the right to hire a lawyer when facing disciplinary proceedings. The law was ...

List of U.S. states by Alford plea usage

List of U.S. states by Alford plea usage documents usage of the form of guilty plea known as the Alford plea in each of the U.S. states in the United States. An Alford plea in the law of the United States is a guilty plea in criminal court, where ...

North Carolina v. Alford

North Carolina v. Alford, 400 U.S. 25, was a case in which the Supreme Court of the United States affirmed that there are no constitutional barriers in place to prevent a judge from accepting a guilty plea from a defendant who wants to plead guil ...

Habeas corpus in the United States

Habeas corpus is a recourse in law challenging the reasons or conditions of a persons confinement under color of law. A petition for habeas corpus is filed with a court that has jurisdiction over the custodian, and if granted, a writ is issued di ...

List of criminal original habeas cases

This is a list of cases concerning criminal law heard by the Supreme Court of the United States in its original habeas jurisdiction granted by § 14 of the Judiciary Act of 1789, 1 Stat. 73, 81–82. That section provides: all the before-mentioned c ...

Tom DeLay campaign finance trial

Tom DeLay, a Republican U.S. Representative from Texas from 1979–83, and from 1985–2006 and the House Majority Leader from 2003–05, was convicted in 2010 of money laundering and conspiracy charges related to illegal campaign finance activities ai ...

The Exonerated

The Exonerated is a made-for-cable television film that dramatizes the true stories of six people who have been wrongfully convicted of murder and other offenses, placed on death row, and later exonerated and freed after serving varying years in ...

The Exonerated (play)

The Exonerated is a 2000 play by Jessica Blank and Erik Jensen that debuted Off-Broadway on October 30, 2000 at 45 Bleecker Theater and ran for over 600 performances. It won numerous awards including the Lucille Lortel Award for Unique Theatrical ...

Majczek and Marcinkiewicz

Joseph Majczek and Theodore Marcinkiewicz were two Polish-American men arrested and convicted of the murder of 57-year-old Chicago police officer William D. Lundy on December 9, 1932. Initially, officials held 10 youths in custody on suspicion of ...

Motion to dismiss in the interest of justice

The motion to dismiss in the interest of justice is a provision of the New York Criminal Procedure Law § 210.40; since being interpreted in People v. Clayton, it has been known as a Clayton motion ".

Pitchess motion

A Pitchess motion is a request made by the defense in a California criminal case, such as a DUI case or a resisting arrest case, to access a law enforcement officers personnel information when the defendant alleges in an affidavit that the office ...

United States constitutional criminal procedure

The United States Constitution contains several provisions regarding the law of criminal procedure. Petit jury and venue provisions - both traceable to enumerated complaints in the Declaration of Independence - are included in Article Three of th ...

List of United States Supreme Court cases involving constitutional criminal procedure

The United States Constitution contains several provisions regarding criminal procedure, including: Article Three, along with Amendments Five, Six, Eight, and Fourteen. Such cases have come to comprise a substantial portion of the Supreme Courts ...

Assistance of Counsel Clause

The Assistance of Counsel Clause of the Sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution provides: "In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right.to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence." The assistance of counsel cla ...

Compulsory Process Clause

The Compulsory Process Clause of the Sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution allows defendants in criminal cases to secure witnesses in their favor through the issuance of a court-ordered subpoena. The Clause is generally read as allowi ...

Double Jeopardy Clause

The Double Jeopardy Clause of the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution provides: "or shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb." The four essential protections included are prohibiti ...

Ineffective assistance of counsel

In United States law, ineffective assistance of counsel is a claim raised by a convicted criminal defendant asserting that the defendants legal counsel performed so ineffectively that it deprived the defendant of the constitutional right guarante ...

Bilal al-Berjawi

Bilal al-Berjawi al-Lubnani was a terror suspect killed by a U.S. drone strike. He was born in Beirut in September 1984. His parents took him to London where he grew up in St. Johns Wood. In 2006 he attended an al-Qaida training camp in Mogadishu ...

Rise and Kill First

Rise and Kill First: The Secret History of Israels Targeted Assassinations is a 2018 book by Ronen Bergman about the history of targeted assassinations by Israels intelligence services. Its author says that Israel has assassinated more people tha ...

2019 Miramar shootout

The December 5, 2019, Miramar shootout was the pursuit of jewelry store robbers in Miramar, Florida, United States, which culminated in a shootout killing the perpetrators, the kidnapped driver of a UPS van, and a bystander. The crime scene was d ...

2015 Boston beheading plot

An attack was plotted by Boston-area resident Usaama Rahim. Rahim initially planned to behead Pamela Geller but when that proved too difficult, he told his nephew David Wright on June 2, 2015, that he had decided to behead a police officer instea ...

Shooting of Stephon Clark

In the late evening of March 18, 2018, Stephon Clark, a 23-year-old black American man, was shot and killed in Meadowview, Sacramento, California by Terrence Mercadal and Jared Robinet, two officers of the Sacramento Police Department in the back ...

Shooting of Zachary Hammond

The shooting of Zachary Hammond occurred on July 26, 2015, in Seneca, South Carolina. Hammond, age 19, was shot in his car during an undercover narcotics operation that targeted his passenger. Hammond, who was unarmed, was shot twice by 32-year-o ...

Evansville race riot

The Evansville Race Riot occurred in July 1903 in Evansville, Indiana and was the worst riot in the citys history. The riots occurred after a black man shot and killed a white policeman and ultimately resulted in 12 deaths. On July 3, an African- ...

Henrys Pub hostage incident

The Henrys Pub hostage incident was a hostage crisis that occurred on September 28, 1990 at Henrys Pub inside the Hotel Durant in Berkeley, California, United States, when Mehrdad Dashti, who had schizophrenia, held 33 hostages for seven hours, t ...

Shooting of Emantic Fitzgerald Bradford Jr.

On November 22, 2018, Emantic Fitzgerald Bradford Jr., an African-American man, was shot three times from behind and killed by police on the night of Thanksgiving, at the Riverchase Galleria shopping mall in Hoover, Alabama. Police responded to a ...

Death of Dil Bahadur Limbu

On March 17, 2009, Dil Bahadur Limbu, a Nepalese man, was shot to death by police constable Hui Ka-ki on a Ho Man Tin hillside in Hong Kong. He was shot two times, one of which struck him in his head and killed him, according to news reports. Pol ...

Nangpa La shooting incident

The Nangpa La shooting incident occurred on September 30, 2006 when a group of unarmed Tibetan refugees attempting to flee Tibet via the Nangpa La pass were fired upon by Chinese border guards. The shooting resulted in at least one death and nume ...

On the Rocks (American TV series)

On the Rocks is an American television sitcom that aired on ABC from September 11, 1975 to May 17, 1976. Originally telecast after Barney Miller, ABC promoted the two shows with the tagline "Funny cops, and funny robbers". It is based on the Brit ...

Oz (TV series)

Oz is an American television drama series created by Tom Fontana, who also wrote or co-wrote all of the series 56 episodes. It was the first one-hour dramatic television series to be produced by the premium cable network HBO. Oz premiered on July ...

American Prison

American Prison: A Reporters Undercover Journey into the Business of Punishment is a 2018 book by Shane Bauer, published by Penguin Press, about incarceration in the United States and the usage of private prisons. Bauer had worked at the Winn Cor ...

Beyond Re-Animator

Beyond Re-Animator is a 2003 Spanish-American horror film directed by Brian Yuzna and starring Jeffrey Combs, Jason Barry, Simon Andreu, Elsa Pataky, and Santiago Segura. It is the third and final installment in the Re-Animator film series. An in ...

Blood Crime

Blood Crime is a 2002 American made-for-television thriller film, starring James Caan and Johnathon Schaech. It was co-written and co-produced by Preston A. Whitmore II and directed by William A. Graham. The film was first aired at USA Network on ...

The Case Is Closed, Forget It

Listruttoria e chiusa: dimentichi is a 1971 Italian crime drama film directed by Damiano Damiani. It is based on the novel Tante Sbarre trad. "Many Bars", written by Leros Pittoni. It was awarded at the Tehran Film Festival.

Celda 211

Juan Oliver wants to make a good impression at his new job as a prison officer and reports to work a day early, leaving his pregnant wife, Elena, at home. During his tour of the prison, an accident occurs that knocks him unconscious. He is rushed ...